Bentogard - Geosynthetic Clay Liner

2.JPGBentoGard™ Geosynthetic Clay Liners (GCL's) are composites that combine geotextile outer layers with a core of low-permeability sodium bentonite clay. Bentonite is a natural sealant, which actuates (hydrates) on contact with water. Geosynthetic Clay Liners are used as a replacement for compacted clay liners. Upon hydration, the bentonite in the GCL swells to form a low permeability clay liner with a hydraulic conductivity of less than 5 x 10-9 cm/sec. As a result, GCL's can provide approximately the same hydraulic protection as one metre of compacted clay.

A BentoGard™ liner is a good choice as one of the components of a composite liner system in landfills or other critical containment systems; the primary goal of a composite liner system is the minimize the migration or contaminants. The increasing interest in GCL’s originate from their unique features, benefits and wide range of applications.Which include use in landfills, for seepage control in water containment, or in lightly contaminated water containment applications. GCL’s must be backfilled to provide confinement pressure in order to develop their full potential for impermeability.
 

BentoGard™ offers many advantages for containment applications.

• GCL’s have a unique self-sealing system as a result of the bentonite clay swelling upon hydration to fill the voids and5.JPG acting as a natural sealant, which reduces the risk of puncture or leakage failure.

• BentoGard™ liners are made into large rolls which offer quick and easy installation, as well as ease of transport. The material is overlapped during installation, eliminating the need for welding or seaming.

• BentoGard™ geosynthetic clay liners are needle-puched to add shear strength. Making the product more durable against installation & settlement stresses, without significant impact on its hydraulic performance.

• BentoGard™ liners offer better resistance to varying weather conditions. Unlike compacted clay liners it can be placed in freezing cold weather.

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